Chrome 7 to get Hardware Acceleration, 60x Faster

Microsoft just launched the Beta of its new Browser IE9 with the first time fully-blown Hardware acceleration.

Even though it does good on Graphics rendering, IE9 actually suffers in JAvascript execution, when compared to Google Chrome. But Google is about to change the RAce forever by Brining more powerful Hardware acceleration to Chrome 7, which would speed up the browser by 60x times.

Hardware acceleration allows the browser to offload intensive tasks like image scaling, rendering complex text or displaying scripted animations to your PC’s graphics card. It has the benefit of freeing up the PC’s main processor and speeding up page load times.

Today’s faster graphics cards have created a new playing field for hardware acceleration. Soon, Firefox 4 will also take advantage of the new technology. Chrome 7’s developer builds already posses Hardware GPU acceleration, but Hardware acceleration is rather much more difficult to implement because of the Chrome’s tightly sandboxed rendering model—which prevents web pages from interacting directly with the OS.

Grab the latest developer build of Chrome 7 and launch it from the command line with the new --enable-accelerated-compositing flag.

Chrome 7 is in its early stages as of now. As per the Google’s new accelerated release schedules, Chrome 7 stable falls within 2010.

More Features

Apart from Hardware acceleration, the Mac OS version of the browser is also experimenting with something Google calls “Tab Overview” or Tabpose. Tabpose is similar to Mac OS X’s Expose; but uses it for switching among Chrome’s Tabs

The Google Instant Search would also be integrated to Chrome 7.

Looks like Google will blow away the competition with Chrome 7. After all, every giant gets lucky on 7.

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